RamsThoughts

May 2, 2008 11:05 pm

Parking sign: What does this mean?

Filed under: Communication,UX - User Experience — ramsblog @ 11:05 pm

We went to a nearby lake yesterday. While looking for a parking, I noticed a spot at a pole where there was a sign “Permit Parking 7:00 am – 5:30 pm”; since it was around 7pm, I just parked the vehicle there. Looking at the sign again and reading all the lines, I was confused. It says “7 days a week”  which sounds appropriate – that those spots are reserved for permit holders all days of the week between the specified time. well, I didn’t understand the next line “24 hrs a day” – I don’t know if 7am – 5:30pm occurs more than once in 24hrs cycle. Or if it meant something else. …

PermitParking

What is your interpretation?

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3 Comments »

  1. Ha Ha.. Funny board.

    I think they wanted to mean that it applies on all days.. and its so natural to say that 24/7 thing for such situation…

    Comment by Veena — May 8, 2008 10:17 pm @ 10:17 pm | Reply

  2. I think so; coincidentally, that spot remains vacant most of the time 🙂

    Comment by ramsblog — May 14, 2008 4:36 pm @ 4:36 pm | Reply

  3. I think that no cars are permitted to park outside of the specified times, both with permits or without. So violaters (those without permit from 7am to 5:30pm and all cars between 5:30pm to 7am) will be towed 24hours a day.

    You were lucky not to have been towed when you parked there!

    Comment by Maher — July 7, 2008 10:16 pm @ 10:16 pm | Reply


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